5 articles


‘Veep’ Review: A Big List of the Ways Women in Politics Get F***ed, and Not in a Good Way

2 hours ago | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Immediate Reaction:

Oh, Amy. After warning Selina against Andrew’s toxic charms, Buddy Calhoun’s campaign manager and girlfriend became the “Lobotomy Barbie” she cautioned her old boss about, standing by her man as he apologized for making an ass of himself — and a joke of their sex life in the process. Both women got screwed by their chosen men, and not in a way they enjoy.

But the fuck-over-y (ovary?) didn’t end there. Selina was spurned by her fellow ex-presidents (all male) at the opening of President Hughes’ library. She, in turn, dismissed the idea of a female architect, telling Gary, “We’re not redoing a kitchen here,” while Marjorie and Catherine lamented the fact they need a man to have a baby. And of course, Selina ended up getting doubly boned by Andrew, first upon learning of his betrayal and then by the woman he cheated with, »


- Ben Travers

Permalink | Report a problem


‘Doctor Who’ Review: Bill Continues to Make Us ‘Smile’ Despite Creepy-Cute Emojibots

3 hours ago | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

[Editor’s Note: The following review of “Doctor Who” Season 10, Episode 2, “Smile,” contains spoilers.]

The Rundown

The Doctor and Bill’s chemistry continued to be perfect even though this was only their first official adventure together. Taking place millennia into the future and on a far-off planet that appeared ideal except for its lack of inhabitants, the episode sneaked in an examination of human nature and cultural fluency within its murder-mystery trappings. This jaunt wasn’t so much about whodunit but why, and despite the “robots taking over” plot, it was the human colonists’ reaction the gave us chills.

Read More: ‘Doctor Who’: The Next Doctor Rumored to Be ‘Chewing Gum’s’ Black Female Star

Here Be Monsters

What’s worse than a man telling a woman to smile? A robot demanding you smile or else it will kill you and use your bones for calcified fertilizer. Regardless, forcing a smile under duress is just psychologically disturbing even if you don’t factor murder into it. »


- Hanh Nguyen

Permalink | Report a problem


Tracy Letts and Debra Winger Are Brilliant As a Couple Who Rediscover Passion In Azazel Jacobs’ ‘The Lovers’ — Tribeca Review

3 hours ago | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

The concept of “The Lovers” is almost too cute: Middle-aged married couple Michael (Tracy Letts) and Mary (Debra Winger) lost interest in each other long ago, and have both launched extramarital affairs, promising their paramours that a divorce is on the horizon. In the midst of planning breakups, however, Michael and Marry suddenly rediscover the passion of their marriage, delay their secret plans to split, and the cheating dynamic twists around. The very notion of faithfulness is turned on its ear.

It’s enough to fuel a lightly satisfying studio romcom, and it already has — Nancy Meyers’ “It’s Complicated” — but “The Lovers” writer-director Azazel Jacobs has a more delicate approach. The movie deals less with awkwardness of this comedic scenario than the emotions it creates for its central duo, and the psychological struggle when words can only go so far.

If it was made 70 years ago, “The Lovers” would »


- Eric Kohn

Permalink | Report a problem


‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ Is a Riveting, Relevant, and Political Drama, So Why Won’t the Creators Say So?

4 hours ago | Indiewire | See recent Indiewire news »

Last night, Hulu’s adaptation of Margaret Atwood’s “The Handmaid’s Tale” premiered at the Tribeca Film Festival. A frightening and incredibly gripping piece of visual storytelling from cinematographer-turned-director Reed Morano, it stands as a remarkable piece of art that speaks to atrocities committed against women around the world and throughout history.

While writer and executive producer Bruce Miller began developing the 33-year-old novel before the rise of Donald Trump, the story of women who have been stripped of all agency to exist solely as breeding vessels for the patriarchy seems all too prescient in a 2017 when immigrants are being separated from their children, facts are “alternative,” and women are losing access to healthcare at the hands of a president who’s admitted sexual assault on audiotape.

As IndieWire’s Liz Shannon Miller noted in her grade-a review:

“Could ‘The Handmaid’s Tale’ really happen?” isn’t the question anymore. »


- Chris O'Falt

Permalink | Report a problem


Engrossing Doc ‘A River Below’ Dives In Search Of Dying Amazon River Dolphins [Tribeca Review]

4 hours ago | The Playlist | See recent The Playlist news »

In the first 15 minutes of the documentary “A River Below,” director Mark Grieco introduces two unforgettable characters, and one mystery. First up is Fernando Trujillo, a conservationist who’s spent years leading a team that tracks the population of Amazon river dolphins—a.k.a. “pink dolphins” or “botos”—in order to warn Brazilians that careless native fisherman are endangering one of their country’s most beloved native animals. Trujillo is one of many conscientious scientists who work behind the scenes to collect data, file reports, and safeguard the world’s natural resources.

Continue reading Engrossing Doc ‘A River Below’ Dives In Search Of Dying Amazon River Dolphins [Tribeca Review] at The Playlist. »

- The Playlist

Permalink | Report a problem


5 articles

  « Prev | Next »

IMDb.com, Inc. takes no responsibility for the content or accuracy of the above news articles, Tweets, or blog posts. This content is published for the entertainment of our users only. The news articles, Tweets, and blog posts do not represent IMDb's opinions nor can we guarantee that the reporting therein is completely factual. Please visit the source responsible for the item in question to report any concerns you may have regarding content or accuracy.

See our NewsDesk partners